You can automatically produce clinical notes using patient-reported information via Qnaires. Natural language is used to support this and refers to the ability to convert patient's Qnaire responses into custom paragraphs, lists, or clinically relevant summaries that can be directly attached to encounter notes.

You can customize exactly how a certain Qnaire response must be formatted in a clinical note.

This leads to increased efficiency when you create encounter notes.

๐Ÿ“Œ Note: You can configure natural language in all questions types, except form, picture, and draw question types.

Steps:

1. From the Questions page within an existing Qnaire, scroll to the specific question. See Creating Qnaires for information on how to navigate to the Questions page.

2. Scroll to the question you want to associate natural language with and click it.

The field expands.

3. In the Natural Language Conversion field,

a. type the response in a sentence format, using #answer to pull in the patient's selected response.

๐Ÿ’ก Tip: Use the below HTML elements and tags for the sentence in the encounter note to appear formatted.

From the example in the above image, if the patient selects the response Nearly every day, the sentence in the encounter notes appears as: When asked how often the patient has had little interest or pleasure doing things, they reported: Nearly every day.

b. type #answer to "pull in" the patient's selected response.

From the example in the above image, If the patient selects the response Nearly every day, the following appears in the encounter notes: Nearly every day which in this case has no relevance to the provider.

๐Ÿ“Œ Note: To create a unique answer per question response, for example, to create a coherent sentence with relevant information or to remove capitalisation, click a response option to the specific question, and in the Natural Language Conversion field, type a sentence as you want it to appear in your encounter notes.

From the example in the above images, If the patient selects the response Nearly every day, the following appears in the encounter notes: The patient mostly has little interest or pleasure doing things.

You can use the following HTML elements when setting up natural language:

Code

Description

<p>

You can define the start of a paragraph using the <p> element.

Paragraphs are blocks of text separated from adjacent blocks of text.

</p>

You can close the paragraph with the </p> element.

<br>

You can create a line break using the <br> element. A line break denotes the end of one line and the start of a new one.

<br>-

You can create a hyphen point using <br>-

<li>

You can create an item in a list (bullet point) using the <li> element.

๐Ÿ“Œ Note: When you insert a bullet point, a line break is automatically added, indicated by the code </li>

<em>TEXT</em>

The text you add between these codes, appears in italics.

<strong>TEXT</strong>

The text you add between these codes, appears in bold.

<u>TEXT</u>

The text you add between these codes, appears underlined.

You can use the following tags when setting up natural language

Tag

Description

#heshe

#himher

#hisher

#himherself

To add Male or Female pronouns add the tags when setting up natural language.

#first_name

This pulls from the patient's demographics: First Name field.

#last_name

This pulls from the patient's demographics: Last Name field.

#age

This pulls from the patient's demographics: Date of Birth field.

#gender

This pulls from the patient's demographics: Sex field.

#patient_title

This pulls from the patient's demographics: Title field.

#answer

This pulls the patient's response to a specific question.

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